Here Are Ins, Outs of U.S. Party Gatherings

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 27, 1996 | Go to article overview

Here Are Ins, Outs of U.S. Party Gatherings


Byline: Dennis R. Maher

Every four years, the Democrat and Republican parties meet and select candidates to run for president and vice president of the United States. These late summer meetings every four years are called the Democratic and Republican National Conventions.

Selecting candidates for the highest office in the land is one of two primary responsibilities of the convention. The second is developing a party platform. The people who attend the conventions are called delegates.

Conventions have become a regular fixture in American history since the 1830s. Prior to the 1830s, selection of party candidates was done by caucus. A caucus is a private meeting of the party leaders - better known as backroom politics. It was Andrew Jackson who demanded that the system be changed.

The first major national convention was held in 1831 by the Anti-Masonic Party. A year later, the Democrats met and nominated Andrew Jackson. Though influential party members continued to chose presidential candidates, the process was more open for the common man.

The first Republican National Convention was held in 1856, and the party nominated John C. Fremont for president. Fremont was a soldier and explorer who had no political experience. By World War I, slightly less than half the states were selecting convention delegates through primary elections. (The people were having more of an input in the selection process.)

Most national conventions were held in cities that were centrally located. Baltimore, Md., was the site of the first six Democratic conventions. The city also was the site of Whig and Republican conventions during the mid-part of the 19th century.

As the population center moved westward, so did the convention sites. Chicago became a favorite host city of both parties - the first in 1860, when the Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln. Altogether, Chicago became the site of 14 Republican conventions and 10 Democratic. This month's Democratic Convention will mark the city's 25th major political convention.

Established by tradition, the party that controls the White House (in today's case, the Democrats) will hold its convention after the other party - in this case, the Republicans.

The Democrats have already allowed the Republicans to have their week in the sun.

As with the Republicans, they hope to show what they have to offer. As in sports, both parties are concerned with the "Big mo," as in momentum.

There is the slight advantage to the party that holds its convention last, hoping the momentum from all the convention hoopla will carry them through Election Day. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Here Are Ins, Outs of U.S. Party Gatherings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.