'Golden Ring' a Treasure Trove of History

By Baumann, Dan | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 20, 1996 | Go to article overview

'Golden Ring' a Treasure Trove of History


Baumann, Dan, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Dan Baumann Daily Herald President

SUZDAL, Russia - No traveler to Russia should consider leaving the country without visiting the glorious old cities known together as the Golden Ring.

Located northeast of Moscow, these cities are a treasure chest of Russia's royal and church history. Towns in the Golden Ring include Zagorsk, Rostov Veliky, Yaroslav, Kostroma, Ivanovo, Suzdal and Vladimir.

The trail between these towns crosses northern Russia's storied birch forests. It passes through dirt poor villages and decaying industrial towns. It includes one city (Kostroma) the Communists closed to western visitors.

Although each of these towns is worth a visit, the brightest jewels are the picturesque onion-dome cities of Zagorsk, Suzdal and Vladimir. If you're visiting Russia, make sure these three towns are on your agenda, and if you have time for only one make it Suzdal.

Suzdal is a town the Communists forgot to ruin. It does not have massive apartment blocks, a train station, factories. What it has is 33 old churches, two monasteries, a convent and an earthen wall that sheltered the town for centuries. The center of town is lined with beautifully preserved wooden houses hundreds of years old.

Though no one knows when it was founded, Suzdal was first mentioned in the Russian Chronicles in 1024 A.D. Its Cathedral of the Nativity of our Lady was begun in 1222 and today houses some of Russia's most ancient and precious art, including the Golden Gates of Suzdal.

Its pleasant pace is enhanced by the pastoral setting. In every direction are spectacular spires and domes and quaint footbridges across the small stream. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'Golden Ring' a Treasure Trove of History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.