Spivey Happy He's Still in the Running

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 1, 1996 | Go to article overview

Spivey Happy He's Still in the Running


Byline: Mark Alesia

ATLANTA - Jim Spivey walked through the Olympic Stadium tunnel Wednesday night, a name out of the past.

"Do it for the old guys," Spivey later recalled somebody yelling.

There were 41 runners in the 5,000 meters. Spivey's oldest competitor was four years younger than him.

At 36, Spivey, who lives in Glen Ellyn, did go out and do it for the "old" guys. In his third Olympics, he qualified for tonight's semifinals with a time of 13:53.16.

It was just the first of three rounds, and he probably won't make it into the finals. But that's not the point. The point is that he's here, with his family, and he's enjoying it. Smelling the roses, for once.

"We went to watch track on Sunday and Monday, and I never would have done that in the past," Spivey said. "I went in the pool with my son."

He flew back to Glen Ellyn the day after the opening ceremonies. He returned last Friday with his wife and son - by car, an eight-hour trip.

"The (Olympic committee) only pays for one trip," Spivey said. "So I flew down for the opening ceremonies and back. I think that was the wise thing to do. My coach, Ken Popejoy, came out to the track twice and it helped a lot."

But the trip took its toll.

"I kind of hurt my hip, driving the car for so long," Spivey said. "I've been really tight in here. I didn't run on Saturday, Sunday, Monday. I was encouraged that it responded tonight, but we'll see how it is tomorrow. That'll be the key."

He did his workouts at Wheaton College, feeling good about how things were progressing.

"I had the best workout of the whole season last Wednesday," Spivey said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Spivey Happy He's Still in the Running
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.