Frequent Visits to Illinois Confirm Stakes Are High for Clinton, Dole

By Doubek, Madeleine | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 30, 1996 | Go to article overview

Frequent Visits to Illinois Confirm Stakes Are High for Clinton, Dole


Doubek, Madeleine, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Madeleine Doubek Daily Herald Political Editor

Lately, it's getting so we can't go more than a couple of weeks without a visit from President Clinton or presidential candidate Bob Dole.

It's barely July and presidential politics and patriotism are heating up as both men make appearances here during the Fourth of July holiday week.

Clinton comes to Chicago for three different events Tuesday, just less than two weeks after he stopped in at McCormick Place to talk to union workers. And Dole, of Kansas, will walk the Wheaton parade route with Gov. Jim Edgar Thursday before giving a speech in a park after the holiday march.

Illinois is a bellwether state toward the top of the electoral vote list. Its voters tend to swing between Democrat and Republican presidential candidates and have voted for every winner this century except in 1916 and 1976.

But Chicago also is an ideal place to stop over on the way to other critical Midwest battlegrounds in the presidential race cartography like Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

The presidential candidates can put in an appearance here and be guaranteed saturation coverage in a major television media market that spreads west nearly to Rockford and south nearly to Peoria, noted Dole's Illinois adviser, Ed Murnane.

"You're being seen by a large segment of the Illinois voting population," he said.

Dole's visit to Wheaton will be his fifth in Illinois just since he announced in late May he would resign from the Senate.

Murnane, an Arlington Heights resident, said these trips send a message to party activists even if most of the rest of the voting population has not yet focused on the fall campaign.

"Bob Dole is sending a message to DuPage Republicans, and that message is, 'Hey, you're important to me and I'm not going to take you for granted,' " Murnane said. "The party workers need to see a candidate and see he is interested in them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Frequent Visits to Illinois Confirm Stakes Are High for Clinton, Dole
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.