A New Angle on Debate over Behavior Program

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 16, 1996 | Go to article overview

A New Angle on Debate over Behavior Program


Byline: Wallace & Culloton

The controversy has quieted some, but residents in the Westbrook School area of Mount Prospect still oppose plans to move a program for children with behavioral problems into the old building next year.

Opponents are focusing on forcing school officials to tighten security at the building so students, some of whom have violent tendencies, don't cause trouble for neighbors.

Some residents want an 8-foot fence erected around the building and an alarm system installed at the school, which already will have a Mount Prospect police officer assigned there.

Lost in the debate, however, is that the Northwest Suburban Academy, a high school behavior disorder program, sits about a mile from Westbrook at Forest View Educational Center in Arlington Heights.

And school officials there say that in the program's two years at Forest View, they've never gotten complaints from area residents about students.

"None. Zero. There has not been a single complaint from anyone," said Northwest Suburban High School District 214 Superintendent Jack Ashenfelter, whose office is at Forest View.

* * *

Big band news: District 214's bands have hit some high notes lately.

The Wheeling High School Wind Symphony and the Prospect High School Symphonic Band were two of 20 high school groups in the state selected for the May 4 Superstate Concert Band Contest at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Meanwhile, Hersey High School's steel drum band and symphonic band just returned Monday from a cruise to the Bahamas, where they played in the 1996 Festival at Sea.

And the May issue of Down Beat magazine names Wheeling High's Jazz Band the best high school blues, pop, rock or instrumental group from the United States and Canada. The honor was part of Down Beat's annual Student Music Awards.

* * *

What's your muse: Published pros weren't the only ones doling out advice at William Fremd High School's second annual Writers Week.

About 30 students, more than half from Fremd, who fancy themselves writers or poets also revealed what moves them to lay words on paper last week.

The readings of one group of students included a short story about suicide and a poem written from the viewpoint of a bitter, lonely grandmother.

But when asked to list what inspires them, it was clear that romance remains the favored fodder for teenage literati.

Student Alex Isaacson said he is influenced by "everyday life. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A New Angle on Debate over Behavior Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.