All Grown Up 'Creep' Got Radiohead Airplay, but the Stylistic and Diverse 'Bends' Lifts These Old School Chums into a Higher Alterna-Pop Realm

By Kening, Dan | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 29, 1996 | Go to article overview

All Grown Up 'Creep' Got Radiohead Airplay, but the Stylistic and Diverse 'Bends' Lifts These Old School Chums into a Higher Alterna-Pop Realm


Kening, Dan, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Dan Kening Daily Herald Music Critic

The scoop

* Who: Radiohead, David Gray

* Where: Metro, 3730 N. Clark St., Chicago

* When: 7 p.m. Thursday

* Tickets: Sold out

It seems like Radiohead may be having the last laugh after all.

While fellow Brit-pop bands Blur and Supergrass may be grabbing all the headlines in the influential U.K. music press, a full year after its release, Radiohead's "The Bends" album is higher on the British charts than much newer albums by Blur and Supergrass.

The band also received three Brit Award nominations - the British equivalent of the Grammy Awards.

Thanks to the sublime hits "Fake Plastic Trees," "Just" and the current single "High and Dry," the Oxford-based group, who play a sold-out show Thursday at Metro in Chicago, is riding high as they return to tour a U.S. that seems receptive to the whole Brit-pop oeuvre. Just ask Oasis.

Then again, Radiohead bassist Colin Greenwood, calling from L.A., isn't quite convinced that stardom in the U.S. is lurking just around the corner. "The Bends" represented a quantum leap from the band's 1993 debut "Pablo Honey," which contained the self-loathing anthem "Creep."

"I'm not so sure that British bands have been doing that well in the States compared to, say, Alanis Morissette," he said in answer to a question about whether the success of Oasis in America has helped Radiohead. "I think Oasis is the only real huge success story of any of the new English bands.

"What has changed is people's attitudes in bands in England that if they want to be successful in America, it's going to take a lot of time and work. You have to spend a lot of time touring. But we've really enjoyed touring in America, and I can hardly think of a place here I wouldn't care to come back to."

Radiohead's history stretches back to their days in Oxford, when Greenwood, his guitarist brother Jonny, vocalist Thom Yorke, guitarist Ed O'Brien and drummer Phil Selway met as adolescents at an all-male private school.

After some time out for college (four of the five members are university graduates, though, ironically, none attended Oxford University), the five drifted back together and took the name Radiohead from a Talking Heads song as their band's name.

The band fairly quickly signed a contract with gargantuan EMI Records (the parent company of Capitol Records), and released "Pablo Honey." Thanks largely to the hit single "Creep" with Yorke's "I'm a creep, I'm a weirdo" chorus, the album sold a very respectable 500,000 copies in the U.S.

It also earned Radiohead the enmity of Melody Maker and the New Musical Express (NME), the two leading national music weeklies in Britain, whose influence on record sales is much stronger than that of publications like Rolling Stone and Spin in the U.S.

Greenwood suspects that some of that may have been due to the class distinctions. Simply put, unlike the defiantly blue-collar members of Oasis, Radiohead came from comfortable middle-class or upper-middle-class backgrounds. Then again, so did groups like Genesis and even Pink Floyd before them.

"We've never tried to hide the fact that we come from middle-class backgrounds," Greenwood said.

"The music papers like Melody Maker and the NME were very slow to write about us because they saw us as this sort of middle class, awkward bunch of private school boys from Oxford before they saw anything else. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

All Grown Up 'Creep' Got Radiohead Airplay, but the Stylistic and Diverse 'Bends' Lifts These Old School Chums into a Higher Alterna-Pop Realm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.