Dist. 44 Works Hard to Get Kids Reading

By Politser-LoVetere, Pam | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 1, 1996 | Go to article overview

Dist. 44 Works Hard to Get Kids Reading


Politser-LoVetere, Pam, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Pam Politser-LoVetere Daily Herald Correspondent

Early in her career, JoAnn Detro remembers teaching reading to kindergartners mostly by requiring children to fill out workbooks - often drawing lines from letters to pictures. Writing was not taught, she said.

Now, visit one of Detro's classrooms, and you will find children engaged in a variety of reading and writing activities.

"I can't get over how things have changed," said Detro, a 20-year veteran who teaches kindergarten at Lombard's Hammerschmidt School.

For example, the class may be receiving a phonics lesson as they cheer the classmate designated special person for the day by focusing on the child's name, Detro said.

The children then answer questions such as how does Jimmy's name begin? Does anyone else's name begin that way? How many letters are in Jimmy's name?

Come on another day, and you will see kindergartners studying with their fourth- or fifth-grade "reading buddies" about penguins or how plants and trees grow.

That's a contrast to many adults' memories of boring textbooks, tiresome worksheets and endless drilling.

That's because teachers in Lombard Elementary District 44 have transformed teaching methods to adopt what language arts coordinator Roberta Berglund calls a more "balanced approach."

"There isn't any single approach to instruction that is effective for all students," Berglund said, explaining the advantages to dividing language arts education into four parts.

Those blocks are guided reading, where teachers select reading materials; self-selected reading; writing; and spelling and phonics. Each section is taught for about 40 minutes every school day.

"Some children are primarily visual learners, some auditory and some use multiple modes to learn. This balanced four-part approach taps into all of the learning modes, which offers the greatest opportunity for all children to succeed," Berglund said.

This approach also eliminates the need for reading groups, which divide classrooms into groups based on ability. At various times, teachers work with individuals, small groups, or the whole class, she said.

In the past, little emphasis was placed on the content of reading assignments, so many topics had little relevance to a child's world, Detro said.

Now, however, much of the reading that is done relates to topics studied in other classes or on television such as social science or the environment, Detro said.

"I have had students at the end of kindergarten who read up to the third-grade level," she added. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dist. 44 Works Hard to Get Kids Reading
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.