Busy Middle School Students Losing Interest in Science Fairs

By St. Clair, Stacy | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 17, 1996 | Go to article overview

Busy Middle School Students Losing Interest in Science Fairs


St. Clair, Stacy, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Stacy St. Clair Daily Herald Staff Writer

Years ago, science fairs drew hordes of students who transformed gymnasiums into poster board paradises with erupting volcanoes, maze-crazed mice and dissected frogs.

The fairs still attract a little lava and some deranged rodents - but many of the participants have vanished.

Science fairs, along with their judges, ribbons and formaldehyde, don't excite students like they used to.

"They're overextended and they're losing interest," said Linda O'Connor, science literature coordinator for the DuPage County regional office of education.

The dwindling number of students taking part in science fairs these days supports O'Connor's claim.

Participation by students in the Illinois Junior Academy of Science Region 9 Science Fair has dropped 27 percent within the last two years.

Only 575 students from DuPage and southern Cook counties entered Saturday's contest at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, compared with more than 800 in 1994.

Interest is low at fairs sponsored by individual school districts, too. Participation rates at Itasca's Peacock Middle School and Lombard's Glenn Westlake Middle School hovered at 7 percent and 3 percent respectively.

And only 11 percent of seventh- and eighth-grade students at Hubble Middle School in Wheaton entered projects this year.

Although some teachers offer extra credit for submitting displays, kids don't want work on a project if it's not mandatory, said Itasca sixth-grader Amanda Simon. Amanda, who has competed at the regional level, most recently exhibited a project on oil's buoyancy.

"According to some people, it's not cool to be smart," she said. "They don't want to do this."

It's almost a contradiction of the space-age student stereotype. These kids are supposed to be more aware of science, technology and the environment.

In some respects, that's still true. Itasca fifth-grader Ericka Haufe can detail how weed killer shatters nature's delicate food chain, but she refuses to enter her school's science fair. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Busy Middle School Students Losing Interest in Science Fairs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.