Satirists Keep Up Tirade of Bush, Cheney Jokes

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 19, 2001 | Go to article overview

Satirists Keep Up Tirade of Bush, Cheney Jokes


Byline: Jack Mabley

I tuned in "Saturday Night Live" thinking they might observe a truce in their George W. Bush-bashing in the cause of harmony and unity during inauguration week.

Surprise! Or maybe no surprise. The opening skit with actors portraying Dick Cheney and Bush was the meanest I've yet seen.

Bush was portrayed as a babbling, giggling idiot. The actor who used to portray Al Gore now is Cheney. He sat in the president's chair, told Bush to behave and was given injections to keep him from dying on the spot.

It went beyond satire. It was vicious. It was like Rush Limbaugh with pictures.

Unfortunately for Bush and Cheney, the two actors have managed remarkable physical resemblances to the two and they have their mannerisms down pat.

Probably not many conservatives watch "Saturday Night Live." The audience is mainly younger people.

But conservatives watching MSNBC Monday night were treated to a rerun of the skit. They probably were as furious as are liberals who stumble onto a Rush Limbaugh broadcast.

As I watched "Saturday Night Live," I wondered about the reaction of the corporate giants who own NBC. They must have wondered "Can't we do something about that?"

They could, but they don't dare.

As I suggested would happen, newspaper cartoonists have gone all out on Bush's ears. Almost every drawing highlights his ears. The net effect is, to say the least, degrading. And disrespectful.

The New Yorker magazine commented: "The prospect of four years of Dubya-isms promises that there is still one fully-primed growth industry out there: ridiculing the Commander-in-Chief."

Last summer I suggested that the winner of the election would be the loser, and the loser would be the winner, losing the battle but in good position to win the war. …

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