Living Alternative Available with Master Planned Communities

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 30, 1996 | Go to article overview

Living Alternative Available with Master Planned Communities


From swimming pools and golf courses, to lush landscaping and strict building controls, master planned communities can offer an attractive alternative to typical new-home communities, said Hugh Smeed, vice president of sales and marketing for Aurora Venture, developer of four master planned communities in the DuPage County portion of west suburban Aurora.

What is a master planned community? Smeed defines one as a several-hundred-acre community with a single land developer who creates an overall land plan and environment. This setting typically includes heavily landscaped greenbelt areas, distinctive neighborhoods with landscaped entrance walls and non-obtrusive directional signs to allow for several types of housing products - from traditional single-family homes to landscape maintenance-free single-family homes to town houses - and, of course, recreational amenities.

Most importantly, Smeed said, a master planned community provides neighborhoods, not just houses.

Neighborhoods in such communities customarily are developed one or two at a time, with home sites then sold both to large-volume and custom builders, Smeed said. And housing types are separated into their own neighborhoods, Smeed said. "For example, at Oakhurst, we have neighborhoods of entry-level single-family homes, town houses for first-time buyers, and upscale and semi-custom single-family homes," he said.

"And each neighborhood has its own identity; homes are similar in terms of size, amenities and price, yet individual in style," he said. "Residents within each section of a community identify with, and feel a real part of, that individual neighborhood."

Aurora Venture, which is owned by the Crown family of Chicago, is developing Oakhurst, Oakhurst North, Stonebridge Country Club and The Villages at Meadow Lakes in Aurora. The company now is branching out of the Aurora market for the first time with plans recently presented for Thornwood, a master planned community in South Elgin, just north of St. Charles.

Each of the four Aurora communities features several different neighborhoods, with homes within each complementing each other in terms of style and price. Each community also boasts recreational amenities, from jogging and biking paths, to parks and lakes, to Stonebridge's championship golf course to Oakhurst North's new sports core, with clubhouse, swimming pool, fitness center, sand volleyball courts and other facilities.

Master planned communities offer social and recreational opportunities - plus good home values, Smeed said. "They represent a very solid housing choice."

He listed some of the benefits master planned communities offer:

- Amenities.

With recreational facilities such as golf courses, country clubs, swimming pools and fitness centers on site, fun is readily available for adults and kids alike. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Living Alternative Available with Master Planned Communities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.