A Will for Life: Your Own FREE Will; WITH THE HELP OF THE NATIONAL HEART RESEARCH FUND UNIQUE DEVELOPMENTS AT WALSGRAVE HOSPITAL COULD MAKE BYPASS OPERATIONS SAFER FOR THOUSANDS OF FUTURE PATIENTS

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), January 30, 2001 | Go to article overview

A Will for Life: Your Own FREE Will; WITH THE HELP OF THE NATIONAL HEART RESEARCH FUND UNIQUE DEVELOPMENTS AT WALSGRAVE HOSPITAL COULD MAKE BYPASS OPERATIONS SAFER FOR THOUSANDS OF FUTURE PATIENTS


Byline: Alison Duck

Make a will in association with the National Heart Research Fund and the Evening Telegraph

SEVEN out of ten people in Britain die without ever making a will. The reason is often not that those seven people had no family or friends but more perhaps that because they simply did not get round to it or did not think it was relevant to them.

Is it relevant to you?

Many people assume that their spouse will automatically inherit everything upon death - this is not necessarily so.

If you and your partner are unmarried then without a will he or she will not automatically receive anything from your estate.

Have you ever thought what would happen to your children if you and your spouse were to die together - making a will gives you the opportunity to cover this event and if appropriate appoint a guardian for your children.

If you are the only member of your family left then without a will your estate will pass to the government.

If you do not make a will then the law will share out your belongings around the family.

If you have a will already you need to keep it up to date - changes in your life such as marriage, divorce or deaths affecting your family/beneficiaries may necessitate a change.

NATIONAL HEART RESEARCH FUND

National Heart Research Fund has over the last 33 years focused on funding vital heart research projects.

Over half the charities income comes from legacies without which their work could not go on.

They recently made a grant of pounds 100,000 to Walsgrave Hospital to assist in funding important research.

Heart disease is Coventry's and Warwickshire's biggest killer and if future generations are to live in a heart disease-free society then more needs to be invested in heart research. …

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A Will for Life: Your Own FREE Will; WITH THE HELP OF THE NATIONAL HEART RESEARCH FUND UNIQUE DEVELOPMENTS AT WALSGRAVE HOSPITAL COULD MAKE BYPASS OPERATIONS SAFER FOR THOUSANDS OF FUTURE PATIENTS
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