Authors to Assemble for Much Ado Panel Sharing Joy of Children's Books

By Hilboldt, Brandy | The Florida Times Union, February 12, 2001 | Go to article overview

Authors to Assemble for Much Ado Panel Sharing Joy of Children's Books


Hilboldt, Brandy, The Florida Times Union


Joining Laura McGee Kvasnosky on "The Joy of Children's Books" panel at Much Ado About Books are the following authors:

-- Hal Higdon: He has written more than 25 books and dozens of articles about running for adults, and he has written about a dozen non-fiction books about sports topics for young adult readers. Currently, he has a picture book for children ages 3 to 6, up on his Internet site, www.halhigdon.com. The book, called Run, Dogs Run, is illustrated by Dana Summers. He is an editorial cartoonist for The Orlando Sentinel who also works on The Middletons and Bound & Gagged comic strips for Tribune Media Services.

Higdon is interested in what part e-books play in modern children's literature.

"Kids are learning to read in multiple forms now," Higdon said. "One of those is online. So many things are interactive now, we have to figure out how to form a bridge between books and . . . stuff like Game Boys."

Higdon lives in Long Beach, Ind., part of the year and has a second home in Ponte Vedra Beach.

-- Marcia S. Freeman: She has written more than 25 books including fiction and non-fiction for children and instructional books for teachers about teaching writing.

"Too often, non-fiction information for kids is in an awful, boring form," Freeman said.

To fix that problem, Freeman offers three suggestions:

1. Make the writing graceful by using literary devices such as similes and metaphors.

2. Use strong verbs. "Don't write, 'Here is a mother squirrel in her nest;' Instead write, 'A mother squirrel scurries around building her nest.' "

3. Talk directly to the reader using words such as "you" and "we." Don't say "the human body." Say, "your body."

Freeman lives in Sarasota, and her work includes Catfish and Spaghetti, Prairie Light, Push and Pull and Going to the City. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Authors to Assemble for Much Ado Panel Sharing Joy of Children's Books
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.