Voice of Scotland; Scots' History Is Not for Sale

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), February 13, 2001 | Go to article overview

Voice of Scotland; Scots' History Is Not for Sale


I WAS amazed to see the papers unearth verbatim reports on the Battle of Culloden. Is that not enough reason for them to be retained in our country of Scotland? Why must greedy buyers from around the world be allowed to filch our history? - T. Miller, Glasgow.

Pensioners'power AS an ex-Royal Navy war veteran and senior citizen, I look forward with great anticipation to the General Election when, with millions of other pensioners, we will use our massive voting power to protest against the Government's inhumane treatment of its elderly population, particularly in relation to pensions, social amenities and welfare.

It's ironic that former enemy nations such as Italy, Germany and Japan provide their elderly population with a much better standard of living. - J. F. O'Hare, Glasgow.

Bad sports COMMENTING on Bertie Ahern's trip to Carfin, Irish Consul Dan Mulhall claimed Irish sport was "a matter of celebration rather than contention".

Ireland's biggest sporting body, the Gaelic Athletic Association, refuses membership to anyone in the British Armed Services and RUC. It formally expelled GAA members who played "foreign" i.e. British sports such as football. Hardly the contention-free scenario Mr Mulhall would have us believe. - Alex Stevenson, Belfast.

Keep them caged I, LIKE many others in this country, think that Jamie Bulger's killers should not be protected with secret identities.

But surely if they were not given this protection, in the long term either one or other of them would be killed - do we want that? Surely the answer lies within our judicial system, whereby these types of killers should be caged for life. - Michael Rowe, Rutherglen, Glasgow.

Real gent TWO years ago my sister-in-law met Jimmy Logan and his wife in a shop in Helensburgh just after she had lost her husband. Like everyone else at such a time, she mentioned her sad loss during a conversation with them. About three days later, a beautiful bouquet of flowers was sent to her.

Here was a personality and his wife, who didn't know her, or even where she stayed, who had gone to all that trouble to bring a little kindness to one in need. …

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