Money for Something.Important!

Information Outlook, January 2001 | Go to article overview

Money for Something.Important!


During a recent bout with insomnia, I was curled up with the remote aim lessly flipping through TV channels. I had given up my search for "quality programming," when a commercial caught my eye. From what my tired mind could understand the fast talking spokesman was pitching a book. Not just any book, mind you, but a "money detector." I listened, and the pitchman's enthusiasm was contagious. If I didn't purchase the book I would not know about the millions of dollars available to me, to you and to millions of other people. Yes, there is money to be had and this book would help me to learn how to find it.

Well, I didn't buy the book. But it led me to think about the difficulty we sometimes have in finding the money for learning and development activities. Learning shouldn't just be about finding funding, but unfortunately it sometimes comes down to exactly that: Do I have the money to participate? In the coming fiscal year, many of us will have to address this question. What will the answer be for you or your organization? Well, we want to help you make "the case" for learning and development ideas by posing a few critical reflection questions here. We want you to succeed and we know that having the funding for learning and development is central to that effort.

Is learning viewed as an essential "employee benefit" within my company or organization?

According to a survey conducted by the International Foundation of Employee Benefits Plans, employees rank continuing education as more important than childcare reimbursement, flextime and family leave. Is this the case in your organization? If not, begin discussing the necessity for on-going learning with your supervisor and colleagues. By demonstrating a genuine commitment to learning, you are more likely to be successful in your quest to ensure adequate funding for those experiences.

Does your organization use a performance management system to evaluate its employees?

Performance management systems operate on the assumption that organizational success results from adding together all the individual outputs. While this may have been true at one time, current research indicates that the real indicator of organizational success is the interaction of people in unexpected and creative ways. …

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Money for Something.Important!
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