Cops Defy Mandate to Improve Discourse with the Deaf

By Drake, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 22, 2001 | Go to article overview

Cops Defy Mandate to Improve Discourse with the Deaf


Drake, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The Metropolitan Police Department has not installed telephone devices for deaf persons or found a reliable sign-language interpreting company as required by a legal settlement, The Washington Times has learned.

D.C. police officials, including Chief Charles H. Ramsey, have said communication problems with the deaf have hindered several investigations, most recently the slayings of two freshmen at Gallaudet University.

A settlement signed Nov. 22 prescribes measures to solve the problem, yet D.C. police have missed several deadlines and failed to designate a person to oversee the effort, police and legal sources told The Times.

Officials have not fully complied with a key mandate, which took effect in December, for announcing to officers during roll call new procedures for dealing with deaf persons, sources said.

"I found out during a meeting [with police] their excuse was that one part of the police department didn't get a full copy of the settlement and they needed to type it up," said David Nelson, treasurer of the D.C. Association of the Deaf.

Mr. Nelson said a police official told him "he didn't have a secretary and needed Chief Ramsey to sign off."

"That's a poor excuse and not acceptable," Mr. Nelson told The Times in a telephone interview through a relay operator.

City and police officials signed a settlement with the Disability Rights Council of Greater Washington and Vernon Shorter, a deaf man who in 1997 was jailed on a burglary charge that was later dropped.

The department's problems in communicating with the deaf were apparent in an investigation two years ago of Gallaudet students suspected of vandalizing Mount Olivet cemetery. Police charged nine current or former students in the case, but the charges were dropped by prosecutors or dismissed by a judge.

Among the settlement's requirements, police officers are supposed to carry cards bearing information about interpreters and the rights of deaf persons - a part of the communication effort deemed the "most important" by the case lawyer who sued the department.

Those cards have not been printed, let alone distributed to officers, sources said.

A senior police official with detailed knowledge of the settlement yesterday confirmed those facts to The Times but insisted "the department is in substantial compliance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cops Defy Mandate to Improve Discourse with the Deaf
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.