Interpersonal SKills: The New Essential in Accounting

By Messmer, Max | The National Public Accountant, February 2001 | Go to article overview

Interpersonal SKills: The New Essential in Accounting


Messmer, Max, The National Public Accountant


Today's employers want more than just good accountants. They seek accountants who exhibit the desire and ability to interact with others in their department, as well as with individuals from different areas in the firm. As a result, strong interpersonal skills have become the new essential to career success.

Developing your interpersonal skills is not only beneficial in helping you satisfy the demands of your employer. It can also greatly reduce work stress, increase your productivity and ultimately enhance your reputation--and perhaps your position-- within the firm.

How can you improve your interpersonal skills? Consider these suggestions:

* Take inventory. Honestly assess your ability to work well with others. Recognize your strengths, admit your weaknesses and identify ways that you can improve. For example, if you rarely speak up during meetings, try to be more proactive in sharing information with others. You don't need to change your personality, but look for ways to make a few simple adjustments.

* Go beyond your job description. How many times have you asked for assistance from someone only to be told, "That's not my responsibility. You'll need to talk to..."? Getting the proverbial "runaround" is not only frustrating, but it leaves you with a bad impression about the individual and his or her company.

* When presented with a request that falls outside of your job responsibilities, show a genuine willingness to be helpful. Ask questions to learn more about the situation, and offer thoughtful suggestions if you can.

* Be a team player. Putting your needs aside for the benefit of the greater good of the group will endear you to colleagues, make you a more desirable person with whom to work and add greater enjoyment to your business life. You will also be setting a positive example for your employees.

* Learn "active listening." Arguably the most underrated interpersonal communication skill, active listening, involves giving your undivided attention to the words spoken by others. It means waiting for your turn to speak, asking for clarification where appropriate and not letting your mind wander.

* Stay focused when you talk. No one enjoys listening to individuals who love to hear themselves speak. It's important to know what you want to say and to say it succinctly and effectively.

* Be open-minded. If you enter a discussion or meeting expecting that certain people won't say anything interesting or relevant, you'll probably miss critical information or ideas. The speakers are also likely to recognize your indifference to what they're sharing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Interpersonal SKills: The New Essential in Accounting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.