Any Questions?; How Miners' Pipe Band Turned into a Triumph

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), March 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

Any Questions?; How Miners' Pipe Band Turned into a Triumph


Byline: Keith Draper

Q WHEN was the Standard Pipe Band formed, and does it still exist?

A SCOTTISH miners came down to Coventry in the years between the wars seeking work at the Binley Pit, and two of them, Jim Cosgrave and Harry Grey, formed a pipe band in 1936. They called it the Binley Village Pipe Band.

During the war many moved into local factories, and some miners, including band members, went to the Standard shadow factory at Banner Lane to work on aero engines. When peace came, and with Jack Grey as pipe major, the band moved to Standard's Canley factory.

It was here that they became involved with the work of the British Legion, and Standard's boss Captain John Black kitted the band out with uniforms - in Royal Stuart tartan.

David Murdoch became pipe major in 1951, and Jimmy Tudhope took over in 1972. Our current pipe major, Andrew Brown, has been pipe major for 11 years.

The band's name changed to the Royal British Legion Triumph Pipe Band, and now has 20 pipers, with six side drummers, three tenor drums and two bass. We take part in competitions all over England and Scotland, play for festivals of remembrance and attend carnivals and fetes.

Our headquarters is the Standard-Triumph Recreation Club in Tile Hill Lane, and we practise on Wednesdays and Fridays. On Sundays there is one- to-one practice for piping.

We are always on the look-out for new members and details are available from Patrick McGlone on 024 7669 5516.

Les Benger, president,

Royal British Legion Triumph Pipe Band.

Q. IS IT true that the Herald pub, Canley, once had a trumpeter on its inn sign?

A. THE pub on the corner of Sir Henry Parkes Road and Canley Road opened in April, 1964, and at the time was the fourth public house in the city to have a name associated with motoring. But I cannot recollect a trumpeter pictured on its inn sign.

It was in fact named after the Herald car produced by the Standard Motor Company at its large works nearby.

The rooms are named after other popular models of the firm's cars, one example being the Pennant Lounge which is circular in shape. The Herald was built for Mitchells and Butlers by Cross and Sons of Coventry, and the architect was H Whiteman and Sons of Queen Victoria Road.

A Parker,

Sir Henry Parkes Road, Canley.

STREETWISE

MIDDLEMARCH ROAD

. …

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