War of Words; Famous Dyslexics Include Entrepreneur Richard Branson, Author Agatha Christie and Prime Minister Winston Churchill Dyslexic Brummie Rose Rogers Blames Birmingham's Education Authority for the Misery She Encountered at School

Birmingham Evening Mail (England), February 6, 2001 | Go to article overview

War of Words; Famous Dyslexics Include Entrepreneur Richard Branson, Author Agatha Christie and Prime Minister Winston Churchill Dyslexic Brummie Rose Rogers Blames Birmingham's Education Authority for the Misery She Encountered at School


Byline: MARTIN BANKS

Dyslexia could be wiped out within the next decade, experts believe. But medical breakthroughs have arrived too late for many adults who struggled through childhood without knowing what was wrong. MARTIN BANKS reports

ROSE Rogers had reached adulthood before she found out she was dyslexic. As a child, she had been placed in a unit for children with special needs, including mental and physical disabilities.

But it wasn't until 17 years after she was first assessed that her true condition was diagnosed. By now she was 27 years old.

Rose says the breakthrough came when a tutor at Bournville College, where she was trying to catch up on the schooling she had missed, sent her to see an educational psychologist when she failed a basic English test. He soon realised what the problem was. But by now, she had missed out on years of vital help.

Understandably bitter, Rose, from south Birmingham, is now planning to sue Birmingham Local Education Authority on the grounds that it failed to diagnose and cater for her special educational needs.

She says: 'It is just a pity that it took so long to spot. If the educational authorities had picked it up when I was at school, the necessary tuition could have been provided and I might have been able to progress at the same rate as my peers.'

Rose, one of six children, recalls how she used to dread receiving complicated instructions in the classroom and had problems spelling even the simplest of words. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

War of Words; Famous Dyslexics Include Entrepreneur Richard Branson, Author Agatha Christie and Prime Minister Winston Churchill Dyslexic Brummie Rose Rogers Blames Birmingham's Education Authority for the Misery She Encountered at School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.