Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930

By Davis, Leroy | The Journal of Southern History, February 2001 | Go to article overview

Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930


Davis, Leroy, The Journal of Southern History


Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930. By Eric Anderson and Alfred A. Moss Jr. (Columbia and London: University of Missouri Press, c. 1999. Pp. xviii, 245. $34.95, ISBN 0-8262-1226-3.)

Dangerous Donations is a major, revisionist look at the relationship between northern philanthropy and southern black education in the early twentieth century. The book's title camouflages its direction. Readers might expect an examination of philanthropic giving based on the widely accepted notion of northern industrialists' need for a submissive black workforce in the southern political economy. Black school officials who were on the receiving end of philanthropy therefore accepted "dangerous donations" that inevitably played into the hands of racist southern whites and their northern corporate elite collaborators. The end result, as the story goes, was the control of the direction and overall "underdevelopment" of African American education. Eric Anderson and Alfred A. Moss Jr. argue that, to the contrary, it was southern whites that looked at northern philanthropy in the early twentieth century as "dangerous" to the South.

Anderson and Moss take their book's title from a 1909 pamphlet, Dangerous Donations, or Degrading Doles, or A Vast Scheme for Capturing and Controlling the Colleges and Universities of the Country, written by Warren A. Candler, a southern white Methodist bishop and a consistent critic of northern philanthropy. The authors cite evidence of other white southerners, on occasion extremists, who accused the northern philanthropic organizations--especially the most important philanthropic organization influencing black educational giving in the South, the General Education Board (GEB), founded in 1902--of supporting schools that failed to "prepare African Americans for their subordinate place in a segregated society" and even of "training the negroes to the vain hope of social equality with whites" (p. 7). Anderson and Moss readily admit that there were northern philanthropic compromises with white southerners, expansion of southern educational programs designed to placate the South, and, initially, little black influence on GEB policy. The authors persuasively conclude, however, that "the foundation philanthropists had a vision of race relations (and black potential) that was significantly different from the ideas of the South's white majority" (p. 11). Anderson and Moss rely on their thorough and detailed reading of philanthropic papers and personal correspondence to support their conclusions.

The authors also present a secondary thesis that expands the research base on African American education and the missionary societies that supported education work. They introduce in two long chapters the little-known history of the American Church Institute for Negroes (ACIN), which in 1906 resurrected white Episcopalian interest in African American education. Although these chapters are rich and introduce important sources chronicling Episcopalian education efforts, at times the authors lose sight of their major revisionist theme. Anderson and Moss come back strong in a final chapter that details the "transformation of northern philanthropy" between 1900 and 1930. The heart of that transformation involved the influence of the missionary societies and included a central role for the foundations, such as the GEB, that replaced individual donors. Though not necessarily new to students of educational history, Anderson and Moss remind us of the northern as well as southern hostility to the influence of the education foundations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.