Students Learn Lobbying and a Lot More

National Catholic Reporter, March 2, 2001 | Go to article overview

Students Learn Lobbying and a Lot More


Nothing is so powerful in breaking down barriers as an encounter with another person. The students in the Catholic schools in Kansas City, Mo., are learning that lesson firsthand when it comes to people who fall into the "poor" category of this culture.

"We had an image of poor people as dirty people, living on the street with raggedy clothes," said 12year-old Erin Campbell. But after she had met with some poor people and heard their stories, she said, "We learned there are working poor. Some people still look nice when they're poor, and we have to go past the looks and try to help them out."

Grade by grade, Tom Turner and Patricia Scherrer Haney (see story page 14) are teaching the Kansas City students to go past not only the looks to see real people but also to go beyond the standard activities for helping people.

As Teresa Malcolm's story illustrates, kids can be quick studies in the social justice arena. Turner and Haney, challenged to "do something" besides talk, have found a way to infuse with life and purpose the words of the American bishops in their 1999 document "Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions."

While pointing to the Catholic commitment to both education and social justice, the bishops wrote that the church's "social heritage is unknown by many Catholics. Sadly, our social doctrine is not shared or taught in a consistent and comprehensive way in too many of our schools, seminaries, religious education programs, colleges and universities. ... The sharing of our social tradition is a defining measure of Catholic education and formation."

It has been amply illustrated that where strong programs of social teaching exist, particularly at the college and university level, students eagerly take up the cause and volunteer, demonstrate, lobby and educate others. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Students Learn Lobbying and a Lot More
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.