Selection Committee + 3,000 Miles = the Renewal of a Local Rivalry

By Knott, Tom | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 21, 2001 | Go to article overview

Selection Committee + 3,000 Miles = the Renewal of a Local Rivalry


Knott, Tom, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The basketball programs at Maryland and Georgetown usually ignore one another, despite their geographical connection.

This is in the spirit of cooperation, sportsmanship and good, clean fun.

A Maryland-Georgetown basketball game comes around about as often as Halley's comet, which adds an exhausting dimension to their Sweet 16 meeting.

This is not what it is all about, this once-a-decade rendezvous, and not to take anything away from the NCAA suits who count Benjamins between these 40-minute, work-release efforts involving many of the finest indentured servants in the land.

The big basketball game between Maryland and Georgetown is tomorrow night in Anaheim, Calif., which is a few miles west of the nation's capital.

Pass the smelling salts. You probably feel faint. This game is so big, incredibly big, as big as it gets, except to Washington Gas, which still expects to be paid in prompt fashion, win or lose, regardless of your school loyalties, religious affiliation and political bent.

How about those skyrocketing gas bills?

As it is, the two teams are trying hard not to get caught up in the hype, although they elected not to stay in Siberia. They want to keep the game in perspective, and so, in an effort to preserve everyone's equilibrium, the Georgetown coaches decided to have their players blow off class this week.

Books come first, as any major college coach with a shoe contract can tell you.

Isn't that what Clem Haskins used to say as he was leading the Minnesota Gophers to national prominence? He certainly did not reveal the truth, which was, "We need to find a few minutes' rest for our team's academic adviser, the most prolific term-paper writer in America."

It is against NCAA rules to rape and pillage the community unless a program is trying to save lives. As you know, inden

tured servants will be indentured servants.

Gary Williams does not want the UNLV job, becoming the 100th or so person to turn down the job, and the beauty in his case is UNLV did not offer him the job or, as far as anyone knows, even consider him for the job. …

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Selection Committee + 3,000 Miles = the Renewal of a Local Rivalry
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