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In 1939 Ernest and Paul Liebmann successfully defended their right to sell ice without a license from the Oklahoma State Corporation Commission before the U.S. Supreme Court. While Justice Louis D. Brandeis generally supported independent businessmen like the Liebmanns, in a controversial dissent from the majority opinion, he argued for the right of states to regulate certain types of businesses for social policy purposes. Nigel Sellars examines the historical context in which the lawsuit occurred and the far-reaching influence of Justice Brandeis's decision.

Why did French Huguenots fleeing Louis XIV in the 1680s receive a warm welcome in England, while German Palatines fleeing economic catastrophe in their homeland only a quarter of a century later met a very chilly reception? Alison Olson compares the English response to the two groups of foreign refugees in an effort to explore changing English attitudes toward foreigners in general over the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

Examining the use of management consultants in modern business practice, Christopher McKenna argues that poor timing, institutionalizing marginalization, and the incongruence of the owner's goals and the McKinsey & Co. consultants' recommendations proved fatal to the survival of the New York Herald Tribune.

The massacre of Palestinian Arabs on 9 April 1948 at Deir Yassin remains a controversial and significant event in modern Middle East history. …

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