Submitting Manuscripts

Community College Review, Winter 2000 | Go to article overview

Submitting Manuscripts


The Community College Review, a quarterly academic journal dedicated to community college education, publishes manuscripts from scholars and practitioners who would like to present their research and experiences in community college education to their colleagues.

The Review is a refereed journal; its editorial staff relies on the advice of a nine-member editorial board composed of community college educators and scholars. The staff reviews all submissions and assigns those manuscripts that meet style and topic guidelines to at least two reviewers for evaluation. Reviewers include members of the editorial board and researchers who have a background in the topic being presented.

Decisions to publish a manuscript rest primarily on the reviewers' recommendations. Exceptions to this policy are made for manuscripts based on practioners' experiences and opinions that are selected by the editors. Each essay published in this category is designated as an "Editor's Choice."

Content

The Review's readers make up a broad national audience that includes community college presidents, administrators, and faculty, as well as university faculty and graduate students involved in community college education. The primary criteria for evaluating a manuscript are the timeliness and relevance of its topic for community college educators.

Approximately 80 % of the manuscripts accepted for publication describe original qualitative or quantitative research that involves community colleges. Essays that combine authors' practical experience with their knowledge about specific topics constitute about 20 % of accepted submissions.

Authors of acceptable research manuscripts make sure that they document design and methodology before presenting results and conclusions. They interpret findings in the context of existing theory and research, and they discuss implications for community colleges as part of the manuscript' s conclusion.

Style

The Review's editorial staff uses the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association as a style guide. …

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