Leave the Caribbean and Play Better Cricket

By Howe, Darcus | New Statesman (1996), March 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

Leave the Caribbean and Play Better Cricket


Howe, Darcus, New Statesman (1996)


I have been trapped on my settee apart from the odd sortie into the light of day. Curtains drawn, essentials at the ready. I have been concentrating on Test cricket wherever possible. My satellite system has allowed me to be physically in England while my head and my heart have been in Sri Lanka, Guyana and Trinidad.

English cricket is experiencing a mild revival. The sports commentators have translated this as an all-embracing renaissance. Before the series that England have just won, Sri Lanka suffered a severe drubbing in South Africa. The series was very close; Sri Lanka held their own.

Moreover, Sri Lankan society seems to have lost its post-independence innocence. The people have had to resist the giant blast of Tamil terrorism. They are a tough bunch, knit together in adversity. Now that they can see some light at the end of the tunnel, their batsmen, young and adventurous, play as fine a game as any. I can sum up England in a short volley of words. They are still trapped in a welfare state of mind, preferring the safety net. There is no sign of the golden years, only solid, "steady as she goes" mediocrity. There is no evidence of adventure, of extraordinary leaps into the dark. We shall see how they perform when the Pakistanis and Australians come over this summer.

The South Africans are in the Caribbean and, after a few years at the bottom of the pile, the West Indians are just about managing to raise their heads above the parapet. Their societies are coated in corruption and violence. Their social life has been reduced to extreme vulgarity. Their social and political leaders have their snouts in the trough in ways that are almost unimaginable.

My nephew is here on a visit from Trinidad. He is in his mid-twenties and hails from the urban ghetto. He tells tales of woe, of bloodthirsty young men and women who then appeal to Allah for forgiveness. Fundamentalist Islam is the only prominent intellectual activity among the urban young, peppered with heavy doses of American TV. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Leave the Caribbean and Play Better Cricket
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.