Collaborative Action Research to Assess Student Learning and Effect Change

By Catelli, Linda A.; Carlino, Joan | Academic Exchange Quarterly, Spring 2001 | Go to article overview

Collaborative Action Research to Assess Student Learning and Effect Change


Catelli, Linda A., Carlino, Joan, Academic Exchange Quarterly


Higher education has been called upon to demonstrate its commitment, capacity, and effectiveness in preparing "quality" teachers in the 21st century. As part of the assessment/audit process, institutions will be expected to provide accrediting agencies with evidence of their effectiveness to prepare competent teacher candidates. This article presents action research studies collaboratively engaged in by a college and a partnering school district to assess the college's teacher education students. Videotaped performances of the students are analyzed to assess their teaching performances as indicators of learning and to establish baseline data for instituting change and improvement. In this article a summary of the action research video studies is presented as well as selected data/findings.

Introduction and Background Information

In the next decade the nation will need over 2.2 million teachers (Riley, 1999). In general, colleges and universities around the nation have been called upon, now more so than in the past, to demonstrate their commitment and ability to meet the changing needs of American society (Goodlad, 1999; Schmidt, 2000). With regard to the need for teachers, higher-education institutions have been asked not only to meet this need, but also to solve the problem of preparing "quality" teachers for America in the 21st century (Riley, 1999). Thus, teacher preparation has become a priority item on the agendas of many colleges and universities, and it is an important presidential campaign issue.

At present, the U.S. Department of Education, through the 1998 Congressional Higher Education Act, Title II, Section 207, is requiring states and higher-education institutions to assess and publicize the effectiveness of their teacher education programs to prepare quality teachers. Section 207 of the law includes new accountability measures that require states and their colleges and universities to announce annually the percentage of students who have passed state teacher-certification exams, and to report on other quality indicators and licensure requirements as well. In essence, for higher education there will be a national and state report card (see U.S. Department of Education, 2000a, 2000b). Subsequently, if a college or university does not achieve a designated passage-rate set by the state in which the college or university resides, then the state's education department or its board of regents may close that institution's teacher education program or subject it to deregistration.

For example, the New York State Board of Regents has set an 80% student passage-rate for its higher-education institutions. That is, if less than 80 percent of the institution's teacher education students pass one or more teacher certification examinations, the institution's teacher education program is subject to deregistration. And if a program, found deficient, does not demonstrate significant annual improvement toward the 80% standard, it, too, is subject to deregistration (see New York State Regents Task Force On Teaching, 1998, pp. 24-25). For small colleges and universities this could be financially devastating; and for larger institutions it may mean that they will no longer be able to use their teacher education programs as the institution's "cash cow."

Further, the U.S. Department of Education and state education departments around the nation are requiring colleges and universities to demonstrate their "institutional" commitment to prepare quality teachers and their capacity to do so by mandating that the institution engage in a comprehensive assessment and/or audit conducted by a designated accrediting association or agency. What we are currently witnessing is not only an assessment of programs in teacher education and the unit of the college that sponsors the program (i.e., schools and departments of education), but also an assessment of the entire institution in terms of its capacity to prepare "quality" teachers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Collaborative Action Research to Assess Student Learning and Effect Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.