Trendsetters


Sean Wyeth

Painting in the Brandywine tradition, artist Sean Wyeth stands out for his emotionally vibrant representational paintings. His works have gained attention for their full spectrum of color, intense details and loosely defined edges, along with his varied subject matter and themes.

At age 18, Wyeth began his professional career in California as a Disney animator--making him the youngest artist with Disney. Three years later, he relocated to Massachussets and studied under famed art legend Norman Rockwell and renowned figure painter Nelson Shanks.

For Wyeth, the most important element in painting is emotion. "Crucial is the freedom to let go and allow one's feelings to be expressed abstractly in the brushwork with power and bravado, while maintaining control of form and chiaroscuro," he said.

Wyeth may be reached at (212) 535-5220 or at seanwyethart@erols.com.

Bradford Brenner

Born in New York City, self-taught artist Bradford Brenner attributes his love of art to the exposure he gained as a child from parents who were serious art collectors. He began pursuing visual art seriously at the age of 29 in 1988. Since then, he has found considerable success with his striking and intimate portraits of young women and floral still lifes among galleries and private and corporate clients.

Asked to describe his paintings, he explained, "I paint to express a feeling or presence. …

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