Beijing Fears Extinction

By Beichman, Arnold | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 12, 2001 | Go to article overview

Beijing Fears Extinction


Beichman, Arnold, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Before he seized power in 1949, Mao Tse-tung pledged publicly that he would - these are his words - "submit to a democratic decision of the people of the whole country the question of whether the Soviet system of society is to be adopted by the whole of China or not."

Mao never did any such thing, of course. There was no "democratic decision." Mao lied, confirming what Robert Conquest once wrote that Leninism "had as one of its main characteristics falsification on an enormous scale." Marxism-Leninism triumphed in China with Mao's Big Lie. The misbegotten People's Republic of China (PRC), which under Mao's direction killed perhaps 50 million people, exists with lying as its modus operandi.

What we heard from Beijing about the Hainan POW's sweating it out in the Hainan Hilton is on a par with the Soviet lies which were told to explain away the 1983 destruction of the civilian Korean airliner during the two-year reign of Yuri Andropov, the ex-KGB chief.

China has never been more dangerous to peace in Asia than it is today because its leadership is in a state of panic. It doesn't quite know what to do to maintain the dictatorship. Its leadership is seeking the impossible - to fit 19th-century Marxism-Leninism into 21st-century globalization. Under "market socialism," people - not the fictitious proletariat - make their own decisions. The communist dictators fear the inevitable - the fall of communism, as in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. They are, therefore, determined to prevent a Chinese "perestroika" from leading to an overthrow of the party dictatorship as Mikhail Gorbachev's "perestroika" did in the Soviet Union.

China's blustering behavior in blaming the United States for the death of a Chinese jet pilot is normal Marxist-Leninist lying. The crash into the U.S. plane was, I believe, a premeditated suicidal-homicidal act with no survivors. It was intended to put our country on a collision course with communist China and thus arouse in the Chinese people the kind of nationalist spirit which would restore the party's legitimacy even among the reformers and what in Mao's day were contemptuously called "capitalist roaders. …

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