Hospital Scandals Hit Vital Medical Research

The Birmingham Post (England), April 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

Hospital Scandals Hit Vital Medical Research


Byline: Jenny Hudson

Vital medical research has been abandoned due to public anger over hospital body parts scandals, a leading Birmingham pathologist warned yesterday.

Most families are refusing to allow any organs or tissue from deceased relatives to be used in research. Before the organ retention controversies at the Diana, Princess of Wales Children's Hospital in Birmingham and Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool, refusal rates were only 20 per cent.

Phillip Cox, a pathologist based at the Women's Hospital in Edgbaston, said research had effectively collapsed because of uncertainty over what was now permitted legally.

And Prof James Underwood, vice-president of the Royal College of Pathologists, hit out at the Government for fuelling the public backlash over organ retention by 'demonising' pathologists. He said there was particular confusion over the regulations for post mortem examinations carried out under the authority of a coroner.

The study of the effect of disease on human tissue, known as histopathology, has played a fundamental part in the advancement of medical science, including the treatment of cancer. But the Department of Health last night confirmed there had been a dramatic increase in the number of people refusing to consent to medical research after a relative's death.

In the late 1980s, there were 20,000 individual donations to medical research nationwide each year following post mortems carried out in hospitals. A decade later, the figure had dropped to just 3,500.

Mr Cox, a pathologist who has carried out extensive studies into congenital diseases which affect babies and the impact of loss of oxygen at birth, is concerned medical research is suffering.

He stopped carrying out research on human tissues 18 months ago, when the organ retention controversies first emerged.

'It is a vast loss for important research. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hospital Scandals Hit Vital Medical Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.