Ataraxia Introduces Fade-Resistant Photographic Prints

Art Business News, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Ataraxia Introduces Fade-Resistant Photographic Prints


BENSALEM, Pa.--Ataraxia Studio here has introduced a fade-resistant process capable of producing color and monochrome photographic prints that last as long as 500 years, according to fading tests made by company expert Henry Wilhelm.

The products created using the fade-resistant products--Collectors Color Prints and Classic Carbon Prints--are available now to individuals, fine art photographers, museums, portrait studios, outsourcing photo labs and archives, in size up to 20 by 24 inches (soon up to 24 by 30 inches).

"People are discovering it. It's just building steam," said owner Racey Gilbert, who added that the technology has been particularly popular with artists who want permanence in the prints sold in galleries. It is very popular for outdoor use in display formats, as well and is usually encapsulated in clear plastic.

"The process," Gilbert said, "relies on the ability of gelatin, sensitized to light by a dichromate, to become insoluble in water after exposure to sunlight." Full color is achieved by layering CMYK pigmented gelatin sheets in succession on a stable base. …

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Ataraxia Introduces Fade-Resistant Photographic Prints
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