United Nations Development Programme: Choices Magazine Interview with Mr. Kofi Annan Secretary-General of the United Nations

By Diallo, Djibril | International Journal of Humanities and Peace, Annual 2000 | Go to article overview

United Nations Development Programme: Choices Magazine Interview with Mr. Kofi Annan Secretary-General of the United Nations


Diallo, Djibril, International Journal of Humanities and Peace


Introduction: In an exclusive interview for CHOICES, the Secretary-General of the United Nations Mr. Kofi Annan, reflects on the role of the UN in the new millennium, the organization's achievements over the last 50 years, and the contributions made by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Editor in Chief of CHOICES, Djibril Diallo, conducted the interview.

Mr. Secretary General, the first question I have for you is related to a theme you have talked about a lot, which is that there can be no peace without development. What in you view are the crucial factors that can ensure both peace and development?

In the world we live in, most of the countries now in conflict also turn out to be poor. The lack good governance; they do not provide the basic amenities for their people. And here I'm referring to education, good health, and clean water. Having these basic necessities, the right regulatory system--and a government that believes in establishing "an enabling environment"--frees and releases the energies of the people to participate in economic and social activity, and prepare for their future. They will be too busy in these constructive areas to get engaged in the sort of wars or conflicts that we've seen destroying so many of these countries.

So I would, in this case, encourage governments to establish the right regulatory systems and to offer education and health services, etc. Of course, the international community still has a responsibility to assist them by providing development assistance and advisory services.

More and more humanitarian needs are taking precedence over development needs. For example, developing countries fear that the money raised to rebuild Kosovo will reduce the funding that would have gone to their development projects. What is your opinion on this?

A humanitarian operation is, by its nature, an emergency operation, where one is forced to move in to save people; the question of alleviating poverty, working with poor countries, and trying to improve their situation is an ongoing process that must continue. To take money away from development for emergency relief in one part of the world and thus ignore the essential task of development in others would be short-sighted and unfortunate.

In my discussions, including during the General Assembly, all the leaders and the donor countries I spoke to assured me that they are not going to do that because they understand the essential task that we are engaged in is to alleviate poverty and foster development. They also realize that it is a sustained effort. If you do not make the necessary investment either in the form of Official Development Assistance (ODA), or grants, or debt-relief or encouraging private investment, you are not going to make the progress you want; in fact, countries may regress. So I hope that donors keep the promises they have made, that they will not reduce assistance to regions like Africa and South Asia.

Looking back over the last 50 years, what do you think have been the most significant achievements of the United Nations?

The UN was born out of conflict and war. And so, at the time of its creation, its founders were very conscious of the need to avoid wars and to protect the individual. This also explains why I've tried to reach out to the public to explain that the ideals and principles of this organization are to protect and defend what belongs to the people. The UN Charter starts with, "We the peoples." I will always place the individual at the centre of everything we are trying to do.

I think one of the UN's major achievements is in the area of human rights-- giving back dignity and respect to the individual. I sometimes wonder what would have happened if we had that yardstick, if we had that convention before World War II. It may not have saved everybody, but at least people would have had a basis to say--"Wait a minute. This is not right. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

United Nations Development Programme: Choices Magazine Interview with Mr. Kofi Annan Secretary-General of the United Nations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.