Gene Logic's Chief Executive Revels in the `Risky' Business

By Stefanova, Kristina | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 30, 2001 | Go to article overview

Gene Logic's Chief Executive Revels in the `Risky' Business


Stefanova, Kristina, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Mark D. Gessler is no mad scientist.

At 39, he runs Gene Logic Inc., a company that is in two of the hottest businesses at the moment: information technology and genetics.

In that role he's forever busy - especially these days. Friday he was named chairman of the company; today his company is releasing its first-quarter earnings report, which he said last week will meet Wall Street's expectations of steady growth.

The company is also in discussions with potential clients.

"We think that our pipeline of potential customers is the best it's ever been and it includes top pharmaceutical companies and biotech companies worldwide," says Mr. Gessler, who has started and seen into fruition six companies over the past two decades.

When big talk about genetic research began in the early 1990s, he saw the opportunity to build a business that would be both profitable and lead to the development of products that could forever change human life.

The result was Gene Logic, which sells subscriptions to its database of genomic research exploring the relationship between human genes and illnesses.

"Now that the [human] genome is sequenced, the next conquest, which will take a heck of a long time and it's extremely important, is to understand how genes are related to disease," says Mr. Gessler, a charming dark-haired Pittsburgh native.

Lounging in a conference room at Gene Logic's newest facility in Gaithersburg, the chief executive took time recently to tell The Washington Times about his business.

"We've built a database that tracks gene activity in human disease," he says. "We don't want to be in competition [with drug-developing biotechnology] companies. We want to enable them to do their work."

Since it was started in 1996, Gene Logic has signed up 16 clients, mostly large pharmaceutical and biotech companies. These subscriptions last up to three years and cost from $6 million to $16 million.

To build its database, the company collects thousands of human tissues from university hospitals. These tissues are studied and classified, as is the family history and habits of each of the subjects, explains Mr. Gessler, casual in a navy blazer, white shirt and khakis. So if a client wants to know what genes are involved in breast cancer, the client can search the database and even narrow it down by asking for a specific age group, habit (smoker, nonsmoker, level of caffeine or alcohol intake) and family medical history.

"Over time we're building up an e-human - like what would be the genomic representation of an average 44-year-old woman on estrogen therapy," Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gene Logic's Chief Executive Revels in the `Risky' Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.