A New Pacific Strategy: Washington Is Evolving a Deterrence Theory for China

By Barry, John | Newsweek, May 7, 2001 | Go to article overview

A New Pacific Strategy: Washington Is Evolving a Deterrence Theory for China


Barry, John, Newsweek


When Disney Productions descended on Hawaii last year to film its forthcoming movie about Pearl Harbor, director Michael Bay was ecstatic at the condition of the U.S. naval base there. "Admiral, this is great," he said to the commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific, Adm. Dennis Blair. "To film a historical movie here we don't have to change a thing."

Recalling that in testimony on Capitol Hill last week, Blair was rueful: "He was excited about it; I was embarrassed." Pearl Harbor Naval Station, headquarters of the U.S. Pacific Command, has been so starved of modernization funds that it's a period-film set. For most of the last half century, the Pacific Command was the military's orphan child--deprived of money that went to Europe, front line of the cold war.

But the Pacific may be neglected no more. President George W. Bush's surprise statement last week that the United States would do "whatever it took" to defend Taiwan from an attack by mainland China appeared to abandon decades of calculated U.S. ambiguity about Washington's intentions in the event of a conflict between the two Chinas. Some question remains about whether Bush meant exactly what he said. But his remark gave a glimpse into a major shift that is gathering momentum in U.S. defense planning. Part of Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's strategic review, this involves changing the focus of America's military from Europe to the Pacific, and putting in place a new doctrine of deterrence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A New Pacific Strategy: Washington Is Evolving a Deterrence Theory for China
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.