African-American Authors

By Nelson, Corinne | Diversity Employers, October 2000 | Go to article overview

African-American Authors


Nelson, Corinne, Diversity Employers


This is an abbreviated listing of new books by African-American authors. A more detailed listing will be published online on THE BLACK COLLEGIAN Online at www.black-collegian. com.

An American Story

Dickerson, Debra J. and Erroll McDonald (Editor)

Pantheon. October. 288p.

ISBN: 0-375-42069-X. $24

Born in 1959, Debra Dickerson is a widely admired journalist. She tells how she became what she is today--from her transformation in the U.S. Air Force; her years at Harvard Law School; and her current position as a journalist.

Lanterns: A Memoir of Mentors

Edelman, Marian Wright

HarperCollins. September. 208p.

ISBN: 0-06-095859-6. $14

Edelman pays tribute to her mentors who helped light her way during her efforts with civil rights and child advocacy struggles. Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert F. Kennedy, Fannie Lou Hamer, and many others helped in one way or other. However, her parents remain her most important mentors.

Take Me to the River

Green, Al with Davin Seay

HarperCollins. September. 352p.

ISBN: 0-380-97622-6. $25

Al Green the pop singer and Reverend Al Green the spiritual man are the same. His life story begins in Jacknash, Arkansas, as a young boy with dreams of stardom and fame; he now lives in Memphis, TN, where he is pastor of the Full Gospel Tabernacle.

Faith, Family, and Finance: the Three Pillars of a Successful Future

Jakes, T.D.

Putnam's. October. 224p.

ISBN: 0-399-14683-0. $21.95

Jakes is a well-known TV minister and is also founder and pastor of the Potter's House in Dallas, Texas. His latest book offers his formula for success: Faith is the foundation of all we want to achieve, family is the anchor that keeps us grounded, and finance is the vessel that brings us to our destination.

King: A Photobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Johnson, Charles and Bob Adelman

Viking. November. 288p.

ISBN: 0-670-89216-5. $40

Johnson, who won a National Book Award for his novel Middle Passage, has teamed up with Adelman, to produce this collection. Text written by Johnson accompanies Adelman's photos, which portray King's public and family life--as son and student, husband and father, powerful preacher and courageous leader.

Destined to Witness: Growing up Black in Nazi Germany

Massaquoi, Hans J.

William Morrow.

November. 464p.

ISBN: 0-688-17155-9. $25

This is the first time ever in literature that a beautifully rendered memoir chronicles the experiences and ultimate survival of a Black youth growing up in Nazi Germany. It's a wonderful book and simply a "must read." The story opens along a parade route amidst a group of schoolchildren saluting Hitler's Black Mercedes as it pulls through the frenzied crowd. In the gathering of blond, blue-eyed children, a small eight-year-old boy stands at attention: young Hans, with curly dark hair and deep brown skin, still shielded by youthful ignorance, but not for long. "Like everyone around me," the adult Hans writes, "I cheered the man whose every waking hour was dedicated to the destruction of 'inferior non-Aryan people' like myself, the same man, who only a few years later would lead his own nation to the greatest catastrophe in its long history and bring the world to the brink of destruction." Massaquoi, born of a successful African father and a white German nurse, grew up in Nazi Germany. He lived with his mothe r after his father and grandfather were forced to return to their homeland of Liberia. Massaquoi eventually lived for a time in Liberia and later immigrated to the United States where he became a journalist and the managing editor of Ebony magazine. This provocative book has been on the best-seller lists in Germany.

Blackgammon

Neff, Heather

One World Ballantine. …

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