The Standards for Technological Literacy: A Needed Change for Technology Education

By Hook, Paul | The Technology Teacher, May 2001 | Go to article overview

The Standards for Technological Literacy: A Needed Change for Technology Education


Hook, Paul, The Technology Teacher


It is now up to the professionals in the field of technology education to embrace, implement, and promote the standards that can insure a bright future for our field of study.

After years of work, the technological standards described in Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (STL) are now ready for implementation. Through cooperation between the International Technology Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation, technology education now has the guidance that has always been missing on a national level. These standards do several things for the field of technology education. They provide identity, recognition, organization, and direction. For the past several years, these components have been missing from our field, but now these standards have the ability to change the current conditions and influence a paradigm shift for our future if we embrace and promote them.

Technology education has been plagued with an identity crisis over the past decade. As many schools and states moved from the old methods and content of shop and forged ahead with the "new" technologies, our field of study became even more varied, complex, and nondescript to those outside the field, both within and outside of education. Several name changes, many contemporary with each other but conflicting, only added to the confusion. During this time, no national standards existed to clear the confusion about who we were or what we did or even what good we were to the future of our students. Most states did not even have state standards for what was generally an elective course area. Each year or two our name changed, as did the course names, sometimes without any content change. In some districts, an even more disturbing situation occurred, no change at all. The 1980s and 90s were a time of necessary growth, change, pain, and confusion. It is now time to move beyond that and reclaim our identity and our position of relevance to all students. Standards for Technological Literacy is our best vehicle for achieving this goal. By instituting its standards all across the country, in all states and in all districts, our identity crisis will end and the importance of technological literacy to the future of our students and this country will once again become apparent to all.

In the area of education, many wonderful, exciting, and worthwhile events take place on a daily basis. Most go unrecognized. Recognition for accomplishments, productivity, and worth are vital to growth, and even existence in today's world. Technology education has not received, as a whole, the recognition it deserves in many areas of the country. The International Technology Education Association is the only national voice our profession possesses. While ITEA is a great organization and resource for technology education, there has been no overriding device to bind our collective skills, our knowledge base, or our profession together. Standards for Technological Literacy changes that situation. With years of work leading to the most scrutinized set of educational standards ever produced in any discipline, the STL standards have been presented to Congress and the President, along with all state education departments. Those who did not know we existed a few short months ago are now impressed with the completeness, order, and usefulness of the Standards for Technological Literacy document. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Standards for Technological Literacy: A Needed Change for Technology Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.