"Soft" News Sometimes Is the Real News

ABA Banking Journal, May 2001 | Go to article overview

"Soft" News Sometimes Is the Real News


IT'S A HARD-BOILED WORLD.

Business is demanding, with pressure to perform, compete, excel. Even when you're not focused on day-to-day operations, there's strategy to consider. Add to that the demands for political involvement.

That doesn't leave a lot of time for things that would be "nice to do," not "need to do." The same goes for articles. We've got plenty of no-nonsense, informative content in this issue: last-minute tips for complying with privacy rules, a heads-up on legal changes affecting commercial lending, and our cover story on integrating brokerage companies. It wouldn't surprise us if a small item on page 10 of this month's Briefing escaped your notice. The article, with accompanying photos of young children in classrooms, has the look of a "feel good" story about it. And so it may get a quick glance, then, flip, goes the page.

But wait a minute. The article talks about a subject that has, or will have, a direct impact on all the bottom-line topics listed above, and a lot more beyond that. It tells the story of two banks' involvement in ABA's annual Teach Children to Save Day.

We all complain about the falling levels of educational competence, and more specifically about the lack of financial knowledge among people in general. Here is a program that lets bankers take steps to help improve the knowledge and skills of future employees and customers.

Purely from a selfish point of view, this effort makes a lot of sense, and so there is a bottom-line benefit, albeit with a timeframe extending beyond the end of the next quarter. …

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