Annotated Bibliography: Children's Folklore Review

By Sullivan, C. W.,, III; Fladenmuller, Kathryn S. | Folklore, April 2001 | Go to article overview

Annotated Bibliography: Children's Folklore Review


Sullivan, C. W.,, III, Fladenmuller, Kathryn S., Folklore


The Children's Folklore Review (CFR) is published twice yearly by the Children's Folklore Section (CFS) of the American Folklore Society with support from East Carolina University. The majority of each issue is composed of articles on any and all aspects of children's traditions--oral, social, customary, and material. The remainder of each issue includes the minutes of the Section's annual meeting, book reviews, materials from the Internet, and notes and announcements. CFR is a refereed journal with an international circulation and an ISSN number; articles that appear in CFR are indexed in the MLA and other major bibliographies.

The formation of the Children's Folklore Section of the American Folklore Society was discussed at a preliminary meeting in October 1977 in Detroit and its organisation formalised in the fall of 1978 in Salt Lake City. Section

members meet at the annual American Folklore Society meetings to hold elections and award prizes. The CFS annually offers the Newell Prize for the best student essay, the Aesop Prize for the children's book which most conscientiously incorporates folklore, the Opie Prize for the best book-length scholarly work in children's folklore, and a Lifetime Achievement Award. The CFS also sponsored the publication of Children's Folklore: A Sourcebook, which appeared in a striking hardcover edition from Garland in 1995 and was published in a soft cover edition from Utah State University Press in 1999.

The following articles have appeared in the first 22.5 volumes of the Children's Folklore Review (originally the Children's Folklore Newsletter). An asterisk (*) indicates that the article won the Children's Folklore Section's Newell Prize.

Arleo, Andy. "Strategy in Counting-Out: Evidence from Saint-Nazaire, France." 14.1 (1991):25-29. An examination of French counting-out techniques and how they contribute to cross-cultural studies in children's folklore.

Beresin, Ann Richman. "`Sui' Generis: Mock Violence in an Urban School Yard." 18.2 (1996):25-35. An examination of the non-violent/violent handball game of "Suicide" which argues that the hybridity of the game reflects its paradoxical status as a mixed genre and unique cultural marker.

Branigan, Michelle. "Blocks and Matchboxes: Negotiation of a Shared Reality Between Two Siblings." 16.1 (1993):3-31.(*) An examination of an episode of play between two siblings that observes the static and dynamic aspects of their interaction.

Bronner, Simon. "Expressing and Creating Ourselves in Childhood: A Commentary." 15.1 (1992):47-59. General thoughts on the evolution of the study of children's folklore and reviews of narrative articles in the same issue.

Bronner, Simon. "History and Organization of Children's Folklore in the American Folklore Society." 20.1-2 (1997-8):57-62. A discussion of the place of children's folklore in the history of the American Folklore Society.

Carnes, Pack. "Arnold Lobel's Fables and Traditional Fable Features." 15.2 (1993):3-19. An investigation of the role of traditional elements in Lobel's Fables and of the relationship between folklore and a literary text.

Carpenter, Carole H. "Developing an Appreciation for the Cultural Significance of Childlore." 17.1 (1994):19-29. A study of the ways in which childlore contributes to "the development and expression of individual, group, and national identity."

Chinery, David. "Snooping for Snipes: America's Favorite Wild Goose Chase." 10.1 (1987):3-4; 10.2 (1987):3-4. A presentation of variations on the traditional snipe hunt and conjectures about the continuance of the tradition.

Conrad, JoAnn. "Bedtime Stories." 21.1 (1998):43-53. A preliminary examination of the narrative interactions between a mother and a small child that occur as a part of a regular bedtime ritual.

Cox, Cynthia Anne. "`Postmodern Fairy Tales' in Contemporary Children's Literature." 16. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Annotated Bibliography: Children's Folklore Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.