The Lincoln Forum: Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg and the Civil War

By Paludan, Phillip | The Journal of Southern History, May 2001 | Go to article overview

The Lincoln Forum: Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg and the Civil War


Paludan, Phillip, The Journal of Southern History


The Lincoln Forum: Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg and the Civil War. Edited by John Y. Simon, Harold Holzer, and William Pederson. (Mason City, Iowa: Savas Publishing Company, c. 1999. Pp. x, 121. $19.95, ISBN 1-882810-37-6.)

This is a collection of speeches given at the meeting of the Lincoln Forum in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in November 1996. The Lincoln fans in the public should enjoy the book, but there is little new here for the specialists. U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor provides a look at the suspension of civil liberties in the North during the war and presents useful background on the origins of the writ of habeas corpus. Justice O'Connor notes the particular danger to civil liberties of a civil war and suggests that a wartime government "might use its extraordinary powers to stamp out political opposition" (p. 2); but she argues, following Mark Neely, that Lincoln did not go so far as that. In fact, O'Connor paints Lincoln as a hero who "was not out to trample on the First Amendment ... [nor] out to crush his political opposition" (p. 14). She goes a little far in her celebration, but her argument generally rings true.

Richard Current uses debates between and among Lincoln historians to assert that "He's Still the Lincoln Nobody Knows." Noting arguments about his marriage, his ability as a strategist, his so-called "dictatorship," and his views on slave emancipation, Current suggests that, so long as scholars can debate his ideals and accomplishments, no one will ever know Lincoln. What Current fails to do is to indicate which side of each of these debates pushes us closer to a better, if never perfect, understanding. The relativism of this essay unfortunately supersedes the balanced judgments that characterize a lifetime of Current's other work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Lincoln Forum: Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg and the Civil War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.