Brain Strain

By Creehan, Sean | Harvard International Review, Summer 2001 | Go to article overview

Brain Strain


Creehan, Sean, Harvard International Review


India's IT Crisis

Having lost many of its most highly skilled workers to the West in the past half century, India struggles today to fill posts in its own burgeoning information technology (IT) sector.

India, unique among developing countries, has the educational capital to produce a highly skilled labor pool. This is in part the legacy of the six Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) founded in the 1950s. Modeled on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the IITs represented one of the cornerstones of Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru's self-sufficiency program. However, with the exodus of many of India's best minds to the West in the following decades, many Indians railed against what they saw as a taxpayer-financed subsidy for Western industry. Though the brain drain rages on, the more pressing problem today is supplying India's own IT industry, one of the most developed in the world. India would do well to invest all it can in its technical-education sector, where an increase in the number of graduates could bolster the tightening high-tech labor market within India.

With the tremendous boom in computer-related industries in the 1980s and 1990s, many of the highly skilled Indians who emigrated in the 1960s and 1970s now find themselves leaders in the global IT sector. The legacy of that migration is profound. Today, approximately one in three Silicon Valley engineers is of Indian ancestry, and Indian CEOs lead seven percent of Silicon Valley high-tech firms. As founders of a wide variety of companies, ranging from Sun Microsystems to Hotmail, Indian emigrants have flourished in the industry, and the services of their successors have commanded a premium. Responding to demand for Indian IT workers, the US Senate increased the quota of HIB visas for skilled workers from 115,000 to 195,000 in 2000. Indians now receive nearly 45 percent of such visas each year. Furthermore, Indian students are increasingly in demand at universities in the United States and Europe. The US Educational Foundation reports that Indian students now rank third in arrivals each year, behind China and Japan. Other countries ranging from Germany to New Zealand have undertaken similar endeavors with the intent of securing for a volatile industry workers that they are unable to supply internally.

In addition to the brain drain, India faces a relatively new problem: a shortfall of IT workers, what one might call a brain strain. The global demand for Indian students is exacerbating a shortage in skilled domestic labor supply within India itself. At the height of the brain drain, India had no skilled sector to speak of. Now India's IT industry holds a 20 percent share of the world market for software development and customized software. If it doubles in size as expected over the next 18 months, its demand for labor will finally exceed domestic supply. A recent study completed by the National Association of Software and Service Companies and the consulting firm McKinsey pegs demand at 140,000 new skilled IT workers in the 2000-2001 fiscal year and a domestic supply of only 73,000 to 85,000 graduates of technical institutes. The outlook appears even less hopeful for the near future: the study predicts that the Indian IT industry will require 2.2 million workers by 2008. Even Tata Consultancy Services, one of India's largest software companies, has felt the effect of such a tight labor market, as it currently has a shortage of over 1,500 personnel despite scoring record profits in the past year. One Tata executive commented, "The present manpower is just adequate for 30 percent of our needs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Brain Strain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.