Editor's Note

By Bridge, Maryellen | Arts & Activities, May 2001 | Go to article overview

Editor's Note


Bridge, Maryellen, Arts & Activities


Every year, we in the editorial office enjoy putting together the May issue. The hundreds of projects we receive for consideration all delight us, but it's especially fun to see the sculptural works that students create. This year, in addition to the student work, we were granted permission to feature the majestic sandstone sculpture of Sety II on our cover. Egyptian art is a favorite of both teachers and students, and Mark Johnson's article, "Learning from Exhibitions: Eternal Egypt ... Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum" (page 16) contains a wealth of information and some wonderful photographs that will enrich your Egyptian art resource materials. We urge those of you who live near a museum on this exhibition's itinerary (page 18) to take advantage of the opportunity and plan a class field trip.

Once inspired by these Egyptian works, challenge your students to create their own art. Any one of the articles we offer in this issue will help you. One place to start is "Mysteries, Myths and Meanings" (page 20), which details how to turn myths and legends into ornate mixed-media boxes. Of course, clay is a great medium for sculptural work. The information included in "Celebrating the Familiar: An Interview with Betty Spindler" (page 22) will enlighten and direct you toward a fun experience wherein students will shape, decorate and glaze some "Fired Up Fruit." "Abstract Sculpture: Wire and Plaster Cloth Creations" (page 29) is a perfect way for middleschoolers to explore the elements of art and principles of design, learning line, texture, color, form and balance as they plan and execute their sculptures.

What does an art teacher do when faced with a ton of plaster gauze and a bird bath salvaged from a scrap heap? …

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