All Things to All People Classical Music Tops the Schedule, but New Ravinia Season Features Pop and Rock Artists Too

By Gowen, Bill | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

All Things to All People Classical Music Tops the Schedule, but New Ravinia Season Features Pop and Rock Artists Too


Gowen, Bill, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Bill Gowen Daily Herald Classical Music Critic

Any summer one could easily say: "The Ravinia Festival has something for everybody."

But that's never been more true than in 2001, when between June 8 and Sept. 6 Ravinia brings its ever-growing public the most comprehensive summer of music in its history - a summer that will follow two major themes - the musical traditions of Vienna and Latin America.

This year, the schedule includes:

- Classical music, with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the festival's centerpiece with 20 concerts during its eight-week residency.

- Visiting orchestras like the Boston Pops and Israel Philharmonic.

- The June 14-17 "Jazz at Ravinia" series.

- A brand-new music theater initiative.

- Traditional concerts and recitals in the Martin Theatre.

- A 24-concert popular music series that opens the festival next Friday with the Ravinia debut of Art Garfunkel and closes the season Sept. 8 with Frank Sinatra Jr.' s musical tribute to his father.

All first year CEO Wels Kauffman has to do, hopefully, is pray for fair weather.

Eschenbach is back

Ravinia is also blessed with the continuing contribution of music director Christoph Eschenbach, whose status was briefly up in the air after earlier this year accepting the music directorship of The Philadelphia Orchestra beginning with the 2003-04 season.

Eschenbach held off on renewing his commitment to Ravinia until he acquainted himself with Kauffman, who late last year followed Zarin Mehta at Ravinia's administrative helm (Mehta became executive director of the New York Philharmonic).

Eschenbach and Kauffman quickly agreed on a new contract for the maestro to remain here through the summer of 2003, when Eschenbach's full-time Philadelphia duties will kick in.

"The Ravinia Festival has brought me so much professional joy," Eschenbach said. "Just like the audiences who return to Ravinia year after year, I am drawn to the alchemy that comes from mixing the world's greatest music with one of the world's finest orchestras in such a glorious setting."

It's off to Vienna

The "Ravinia travels to Vienna" theme is pervasive throughout the summer. In the classical-music concerts alone (including those by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra) some 50 Viennese-influenced works will be offered.

"We are attempting to show the important influence of music on us through the Viennese culture, going back several centuries through the present," Eschenbach said.

Ravinia's Viennese musical menu will include works by composers we usually associate with that great Austrian city, such as Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms and Mahler, but also the big names of the so-called "Second Viennese School" of music that took hold shortly after the turn of the 20th century: Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern.

Ravinia concert-goers got a taste of Schoenberg as the young romantic with last summer's presentation of the gigantic symphonic song cycle, "Gurrelieder." This summer, several more of Schoenberg's works will be heard, including the Chamber Symphony No. 1, "Pelleas und Melisande," "Verklaerte Nacht," and several pieces for piano and various chamber ensembles.

"Arnold Schoenberg is a genius composer for my tastes, one of the greatest the 20th century created," Eschenbach said. "And he has created among his students Berg and Webern, as great a caliber composers as he was. In the 15 pieces we have in this summer's programs of these three composers, we are hoping to succeed in helping the musical public erase the negative impression of this great music."

A pertinent example is Berg's Violin Concerto, which was premiered in the 1930s. This underappreciated, yet lyrical work will be played by Leonidas Kovakos and the CSO, conducted by Sir Andrew Davis July 14.

But that's not to say traditional "summer festival favorites" won't be on the agenda. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

All Things to All People Classical Music Tops the Schedule, but New Ravinia Season Features Pop and Rock Artists Too
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.