The Boy Blown Up by Terrorist Torch Bomb

By Davenport, Justin; Ramsay, Allan | The Evening Standard (London, England), February 28, 2001 | Go to article overview

The Boy Blown Up by Terrorist Torch Bomb


Davenport, Justin, Ramsay, Allan, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: JUSTIN DAVENPORT;ALLAN RAMSAY

THIS is the first picture of the cadet left maimed and blind by a torch bomb he picked up outside a Territorial Army base in west London.

Fourteen-year-old Stephen Menary, who is photographed proudly wearing a Chelsea shirt, has not been told he has permanently lost his sight.

Seven days after he picked up the torch, packed with high explosive Semtex, Stephen's condition is described by Chelsea and Westminster hospital as "very poorly".

Today Scotland Yard anti-terrorist officers renewed warnings to Londoners to be on their guard for suspect packages and said the Shepherd's Bush torch bomb could have been the work of an Irish dissident group. Stephen's mother, Carol Menary, who will appeal for witnesses on the BBC's Crimewatch UK tonight, said her son lost the use of one eye when he was four months old through a rare form of cancer.

"When they find the person who did this I would ask them what they got out of it," said Ms Menary, who along with Stephen's father has been at his hospital bedside since the attack.

"I try to think of positive things. I

try to think how I could help him, what gadgets there are. I won't let him shrivel up, I'm not letting that happen to him. He needs me to be strong - he's not used to me being like this. I won't let him down. He's got a terrific sense of character and I don't want that to break down.

His idea was to be a policeman or a soldier," she told Crimewatch UK.

Stephen also lost part of his arm in the blast, more details of which were released today. …

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