Rushdie in Notting Hill; Homes and Property

By Russell, Rosalind; Miller, Compton | The Evening Standard (London, England), February 28, 2001 | Go to article overview

Rushdie in Notting Hill; Homes and Property


Russell, Rosalind, Miller, Compton, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: ROSALIND RUSSELL;COMPTON MILLER

Rushdie in Notting Hill

Salman Rushdie (right) has become the latest celeb to live in Notting Hill.

He has rented a two/three bedroom, mews house for an estimated [pound]1,000 a week.

The Victorian property was previously occupied by pop singer Jason Donovan.

Rushdie still has 24-hour Special Branch protection, following the fatwa placed on his head by the late Ayatollah Khomeini. And Peter Mandelson, the equally closely guarded former Ulster secretary, lives in the adjoining street.

Lady Houstoun-Boswall, former headmistress of the pukka Harrodian School in Barnes, is selling her Grade II-listed Hampton Court mansion for [pound]7 million through Colliers RH. The partially restored Georgian property occupies 26,300sq ft and its nine-acre gardens overlook Bushy Park. Unusual features include a galleried reception hall, large conservatory, theatre and octagonal summer house.

"There's planning permission for use as a hotel," says the agent.

Former model and TV presenter, Irish-born Amanda Byram (right) - brought in to boost flagging viewing figures for the Big Breakfast - and her boyfriend, comedian Patrick Kielty, have rented a maisonette in Chelsea. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Rushdie in Notting Hill; Homes and Property
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.