PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY: Vol. 50, No. 200 July 2000

The Review of Metaphysics, June 2000 | Go to article overview

PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY: Vol. 50, No. 200 July 2000


Is `Normal Grief' a Mental Disorder?, STEPHEN WILKINSON

This paper argues that grief (including "normal grief") is a mental disorder. The paper discusses the main concepts involved briefly, and states the primafacie case in favour of the view that grief is a disorder. The paper considers objections that grief is not a disorder because (a) it is a normal response; (b) it is more healthy than failing to grieve; (c) it involves cognitive good; (d) it is a rational response; (e) it ought not to be medicalized or treated; (f) it has a "distinct sustaining cause." Each objection is flawed, and the author concludes that there is a strong case for regarding even "normal" grief as a disorder. Alternatively, the arguments in this paper may be taken as attacking "orthodox" definitions of mental health (for example, in DSM 4th ed.) by providing an extended discussion of one particular counter-example.--Correspondence to: s.wilkinson@phil.keele.ac.uk

Truth and Contradiction, GRAHAM PRIEST

This paper argues that there is nothing about truth as such that prevents contradictions from being true. The paper argues this by considering the main standard accounts of truth, and showing that they are quite compatible with the existence of true contradictions. Indeed, in many cases, they are actually friendly to the idea.--Correspondence to: g.priest@mailbox.uq.edu.au

Deviant Causal Chains and Hallucinations: a Problem for the AntiCausalist, PAUL COATES

The causal theory of perception is opposed by anti-causalists, who claim that the notion of causality is not part of our ordinary concept of perception, and sometimes raise the possibility of deviant causal chain counter-examples in an attempt to undermine the causal theory. The author argues that such examples in fact cause more difficulties for anti-causalist accounts of perception. Anti-causalists are unable to explain how the examples can be recognized as deviant, and why such cases are incompatible with perception. They have a general problem in providing a satisfactory account of hallucination. A comparison with certain complex cases of illusion suggests that our grasp of the concept of perception does indeed involve some kind of understanding of the kinds of causal chains appropriate to genuine perception.--Correspondence to: P.Coates@herts.ac.uk

Physicalism and the Fallacy of Composition, CRAWFORD L. ELDER

Physicalism, as it is treated here, holds that every instance of causation reported by the special sciences is shadowed, even rivalled, by causation at the level of microphysics. The reported "cause" is embodied in one massive collection of microparticle events; the "event" in another; the former brings about the latter in accordance with the laws of microphysics. …

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PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY: Vol. 50, No. 200 July 2000
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