PHILOSOPHY: Vol. 75, No. 293 July, 2000

The Review of Metaphysics, June 2000 | Go to article overview

PHILOSOPHY: Vol. 75, No. 293 July, 2000


Courses of Action, or the Uncatchableness of Mental Acts, GILBERT RYLE

What are the acts or processes of thinking like? In this hitherto unpublished article, Ryle suggests that attempting to catch thought is like trying to extract a jellyfish out of the sea from a fast-moving boat with only a knitting needle. Thinking is a higher order activity, not capturable by the introspection of momentary mental acts. It is like dieting, waiting, spring-cleaning, puppy-training, etc., in that the actions which form its basis are intermittent and gappy. Thinking governs, but is not reducible to the lower order actions of which we are from time to time aware.

The Empiricist Conception of Experience, JENNIFER NAGEL

Does a healthy respect for the deliverances of experience require us to give up any claim to non-trivial a priori knowledge? One way it might not would be if the very admission of something as an episode of experience required the use of substantive a priori knowledge--if there were certain a priori standards that a representation had to meet in order to count as an experience, rather than as, say, a memory or daydream. What is surprising is that we can find elements of this essentially Kantian line about experience even in the work of empiricists such as John Locke and Bas van Fraassen.--Correspondence to: jennifer.nagel@utoronto.ca

Some Pictures are Worth 2 Sentences, PHILIP KITCHNER and ACHILLE VARZI

Understanding People, NEIL COOPER

The Evolution of Language: Truth and Lies, STEPHEN R.L. CLARK

There is both theoretical and experimental reason to suppose that no one could ever have learned to speak without an environment of language-users. …

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PHILOSOPHY: Vol. 75, No. 293 July, 2000
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