Pollen Provides Ancient Weather Report

Science News, April 8, 1989 | Go to article overview

Pollen Provides Ancient Weather Report


Pollen provides ancient weather report

For allergy sufferers, pollen seems to exist for the sole purpose of making people miserable. But palynologists, who study pollen and spores, say the plant grains are nothing to sneeze at. Since pollen can survive in sediments and rock for thousands and even millions of years, it gives scientists a portrait of the plants that once covered an area. At the forefront of pollen science, a new study shows these tiny reproductive elements can provide a detailed record of climate fluctuations during the last Ice Age cycle.

Researchers from the Laboratory of Historical Botany and Palynology in Marseilles, France, report in the March 23 NATURE they they have compiled a 140,000-year-long climate history for eastern France based on pollen records for that region. They collected the fossil pollen from sediments that have built up over the last 140,000 years in a lake and a swamp.

The scientists created the climate history through a complex translation process involving several stages and mathematical techniques. First they gathered modern pollen samples from a variety of locales in Europe, North Africa and Siberia. Then, based on the different kinds of vegetation found in each sample, they defined a mathematical relationship between the pollen and the climate conditions for that particular area. Finally they matched the fossil pollen samples against the most similar modern ones. …

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