The Black Male Research Agenda

By Roach, Ronald | Black Issues in Higher Education, May 10, 2001 | Go to article overview

The Black Male Research Agenda


Roach, Ronald, Black Issues in Higher Education


Scholars say research studying Black males is lagging in analysis, proposed solutions

If a wide-ranging research enterprise can be said to exist around defining and proposing solutions for the social dilemmas of African American males, a number of prominent Black scholars and academic administrators can take credit for getting it off the ground.

Experts say the study of Black males has attracted a critical mass of scholars and academic administrators who are getting some attention and support to examine Black male issues.

Nonetheless, the efforts toward studying Black males are believed to be lagging in analysis and proposed solutions.

"We need more research," says Dr. Lee Jones, associate dean of academic affairs and instruction at Florida State University.

One advocate of Black male research is a widely known senior statesman in the academy. As one of the founders and the first research director of the Head Start program, Dr. Edmund Gordon has long recognized the need for a research agenda to be developed around African American males.

At a time when most scholars would have already enjoyed retirement for at least a decade, Gordon, 79, remains heavily engaged in developmental psychology work. This past academic year, the senior scholar whose academic career spans six decades, has had to balance research with administrative duties as the interim dean of Columbia University's Teachers College. Yet despite dean duties cutting into his research time, Gordon has stayed focused on work that broadly examines the intellectual development of minority children.

The plight of African American males inspires the most fervent energy and sense of urgency in Gordon given that he has been urging scholars and government officials to devote resources to the subject for more than a decade. Gordon is not satisfied that enough research is getting past the mere documentation of social problems affecting Black males.

"Most of (the research) is descriptive and not analytical of the causes (of social problems)," Gordon says. Gordon has taken the lead in rallying scholars around a research agenda that focuses broadly on African American males.

Establishing and building support for academic conferences and symposiums on Black males resulted largely in the 1990s due to the advocacy of individuals such as Gordon.

Last year, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Educational Research and Improvement sponsored a symposium that examined African American males and education. Gordon, who sat on an education department research advisory committee, says he and a colleague had urged the department to facilitate the conference partly to send a signal to the American academic community that African American males are worthy of serious attention. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Black Male Research Agenda
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.