The Journal OF Lynton Charles FIDUCIARY SECRETARY TO THE TREASURY

New Statesman (1996), June 4, 2001 | Go to article overview

The Journal OF Lynton Charles FIDUCIARY SECRETARY TO THE TREASURY


Monday And this is a totally new one on me. It is one thing to do an election hustings when you're in opposition (which for most of my political life we were), but quite another when you are yourself the government. You become the local representative for everything that's gone wrong with their lives. Grandma spent half an hour on a trolley in Southampton General? This is because the NHS is collapsing and it's your fault. The council has failed to replace the pavement along Laburnum Road and Mr Bloggs has fallen over and dislocated his elbow? Public services are in disarray and it's your negligence that has caused it. Foot-and-mouth? My fault. Last autumn's floods? My fault. The cat's haemorrhoids? Need you ask.

The hall at the Charles Darwin primary school is set with bucket seats for 200 or more, and every seat is taken. There are little gaggles around the doors, mostly of Cheryl's friends in the Socialist Alliance. It isn't surprising they're here, because they live for moments like this when they have a whole audience at their mercy. They are all women, and, I would guess, mostly teachers. Cheryl is among them, and we exchange pleasant smiles as we pass.

The only people wearing our stickers are Harriet and her nephew Damien. Our main effort is up-county, where the majority is only 1,200. The Tories, however, are so disorganised and dim that they've turned out a dozen supporters who really ought to be facing off our canvassers in the marginal. Dolts. In addition, there are five Zimmers, three wheelchairs, any number of walking sticks, a man with a very large parrot, a man who looks exactly like Alfred, Lord Tennyson down to the stiff collar and a belligerent-looking fat old lady in the front row who - I can tell - means trouble.

We take our seats on the dais. The young Tory, the even younger Lib Dem, the infant Green, the grog-blossomed ex-actor who represents the UK Independence Party, a man dressed as an Edwardian duchess in tiara and spangly ballgown, and one of those God-awful, look-at-me grins who is standing as an Independent, Cheryl and me. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Journal OF Lynton Charles FIDUCIARY SECRETARY TO THE TREASURY
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.