AIDS Research Comes to Patients' Home Towns

By Young, Frank | FDA Consumer, May 1989 | Go to article overview

AIDS Research Comes to Patients' Home Towns


Young, Frank, FDA Consumer


AIDS Research Comes to Patients' Home Towns

The nation's war against acquired immune deficiency syndrome received a significant boost late last year, when Congress passed legislation authorizing federal funding of more AIDS studies in local communities around the country. The potential benefits of community-based AIDS research are twofold: First, such research can bring promising but still experimental drugs to more patients than can be served by existing studies, conducted mainly at universities and large hospitals. Second, with the larger patient population and resulting data base afforded by properly conducted community-based research, AIDS therapies that prove to be safe and effective can be identified and brought to the market more quickly. By the same token, unsuccessful therapies can be eliminated earlier. In addition, by systematically monitoring their patients, community physicians may help generate ideas for treatment that can be further tested in more formal research.

We at FDA, together with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, will do our utmost to make this new system work. As the number of AIDS cases rises, we must find new ways to increase patient access to experimental drugs. This is especially critical since we are dealing with a fatal disease for which no cure yet exists.

Increasing the role of community-based AIDS research is clearly an avenue whose time has come. In the early years of the AIDS epidemic, patients were cared for mainly in large teaching hospitals and medical centers. But that changed as the number of cases grew (86,157 as of Feb. 13) and as more and better information on patient care reached a wider medical community. Today, the care of many AIDS patients is centered not in a few major academic medical centers, but in clinics, private doctors' offices, and health maintenance organizations in the patients' own home communities. With this trend, more physicians have developed greater expertise in treating AIDS patients and a willingness to participate in clinical research.

NIAID, a part of the National Institutes of Health, is in charge of implementing the new legislation on community-based AIDS research, and FDA is actively involved as well. The new law calls for NIAID to fund community-based clinical studies on experimental AIDS treatments approved by FDA for investigational use. These studies--to be conducted at doctors' offices, clinics, community hospitals, drug addiction treatment centers, and other primary care settings--will provide a substantially greater number of AIDS patients with a measure of hope. In particular, they will offer greater treatment access for groups of AIDS patients that have not always had full opportunity to participate in existing studies: intravenous drug users, blacks, Hispanics, women (including pregnant women, whose babies are at risk of being born with AIDS), and those not living near major research facilities.

Community-based research already has proven successful in studying new treatments for pain, cancer and arthritis (albeit without the strong patient initiative that we see with AIDS). For example, many of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available today to treat arthritis had been widely researched in numerous small, community-based studies. And, several community organizations are, in fact, already doing AIDS research, including the New York-based Community Research Initiative and the San Francisco County Community Consortium. The latter, a group of about 300 doctors treating people with AIDS, recently studied use of an aerosolized version of the drug pentamidine to help prevent a potentially deadly form of pneumonia that often afflicts AIDS patients. Based on the study results, FDA approved wider use of the promising drug (see "Wider Use of Pneumonia Drug Approved" on the AIDS Page of the April 1989 FDA Consumer). These research findings on aerosolized pentamidine clearly demonstrate the positive contribution that community-based based research can make in the war against AIDS. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

AIDS Research Comes to Patients' Home Towns
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.