How Psychology Can Help Create a Brand Culture

By Ellwood, lain | Marketing, June 7, 2001 | Go to article overview

How Psychology Can Help Create a Brand Culture


Ellwood, lain, Marketing


To build a strong brand culture, you must harness your employees' emotional capital

Whether you are a chief executive or a line manager we all want a well-motivated team that comprehends and communicates our brand promise. Corporations are finally realising that their employees are their vital assets. Successful organisations are able to interconnect their employees' personalities into a strong brand culture that expresses their brand promise. As PretA Manger and The Car phone Warehouse show, when this happens, you create an unbeatable team.

In the past, attempts at internal branding have relied on banal US football team hype. It is not surprising that British employees felt conspicuous, cheerleading at the company barbecue. Our balance of personality traits is different, and we are motivated differently.

Directors need to take internal cultural factors into account when defining their company's destiny. To achieve a strong internal brand culture, you need to harness employees' emotional capital. Organisations need to find ways to connect these emotions with corporate goals. It is not easy, but the rewards

are dramatic. It creates a reserve of emotional capital that is resilient and flexible -- an invaluable business asset to the corporation and customers alike.

Psychologists have developed a number of methods to accelerate this process of building winning teams. Using a psychological approach, we can construct a strong brand personality that genuinely reflects the desires of the people who define the business, and therefore generate significantly higher buy-in to the brand promise.

There is now a widely agreed set of fundamentals that make up personality constructs. …

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