Bellcore and Carnegie Mellon Create Information Networking Programs

Information Today, May 1989 | Go to article overview

Bellcore and Carnegie Mellon Create Information Networking Programs


Bellcore And Carnegie Mellon Create Information Networking Programs

Bellcore has committed some $1 million to assist Carnegie Mellon University in developing the nation's first graduate-level programs in Information Networking--which combine studies in computer science, electrical engineering, public policy and business administration.

Representatives from Bellcore, the research and engineering consortium serving the Bell operating companies, and Carnegie Mellon, met to sign the agreement creating an Information Networking Institute at the university that will coordinate the new, broad-based educational programs. Information networking is the accessing, processing and managing of information sent across public and private networks to provide solutions to wide-ranging business problems.

"We still have a long way to go to reach the full networking capabilities required by the Information Age," said Irwin Dorros, Bellcore's executive vice president-technical services. "This new program recognizes that the information technologies have been merging and advancing at an incredible pace.

"Information networking is the engine that will drive business, industry and, indeed, our society," he said.

Dorros, acting on behalf of Bellcore's owners--the regional Bell companies--met with Carnegie Mellon Provost Angel G. Jordan for the formal signing of the agreement.

"One of Carnegie Mellon's strengths is our ability to develop interdisciplinary programs," Jordan said. "Our scholars and researchers in industrial administration, computer science, electrical and computer engineering, and engineering and public policy are among the top in their fields. Together, they will be able to offer a unique program that draws on expertise in existing disciplines to create a new specialty."

Dorros said Bellcore also anticipates providing Carnegie Mellon with funding for specific research projects under a separate agreement. Bellcore is identifying potential research work that could be undertaken by the university, he added.

Jordan said two graduate programs are slated to begin in the fall semester of 1989--a 14-month Master of Science (MS) in Information Networking, and Advanced Technology Innovative (ATI), a four-month, non-degree program. The master's program has an open enrollment; candidates must hold a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, computer science, or a closely related field and meet the normal entrance requirements of Carnegie Mellon. …

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